0 Flares 0 Flares ×

The History of the White Cane

The color and length matters
Today’s typical mobility cane is white with a red strip

The colors and length of the mobility can make a difference to the safety of a blind individual. I am learning more every day about this topic and wanted to share what I’ve gleaned over the past few weeks.

Lynda Jones, a colleague in the peer mentor program for VisionAware, has researched the history of white canes for White Cane Safety Day. She reported back several times colors of the canesharing her excitement as she dug deeper  into her topics and explored the use, the color (s) and opinions about cane safety. She has interviewed a variety of people involved with canes, from orientation and mobility instructors, manufacturers, and cane users. She also looked at the safety laws.

Her excitement was infectious and I think we all caught onto it and were eager to read the article as it came together.  I have learned a lot through her research. I’m so pleased to share Lynda’s article with you.

In Part 1, Lynda shares the impact of colors on the new, long mobility cane and a thorough background of how it came to be white. As a member of the Lions Club, it was so interesting for me to read about the role the International Lions Club played in making the cane safer for blind pedestrians. cane safety

Click on the link to read Lynda’s article on the VisionAware site.

Take a moment to share the most interesting fact you learned about the long mobility cane in the Comments below. How much did you already know about cane use before reading this article? 

You have just read “The History of the White Cane” by Lynda Jones as featured on the VisionAware site. Don’t forget to leave your comment! Copyrighted by Lynda Jones.

Follow me:

Amy

Amy Bovaird is the author of two best-selling books Mobility Matters and Cane Confessions: The Lighter Side to Mobility.  An accomplished and inspirational speaker, she talks on a variety of topics based on her life experiences and continues to educate and inspire others through her writing and speaking. She lives with a dual disability—progressive vision and hearing loss due to Usher Syndrome. She blogs about the challenges she faces as she loses more vision and hearing and manages to find humor around almost every corner, AmyBovaird.com. Her books are available at Amazon. Follow her on social media at Amy Bovaird, Author.
Follow me:

Latest posts by Amy (see all)

The History of the White Cane
Tagged on:                                                         

4 thoughts on “The History of the White Cane

  • October 19, 2015 at 9:11 am
    Permalink

    I haven’t ever seen one. Not only do I not get out, being disabled myself, but I’ve only seen white canes here in the UK.

  • October 19, 2015 at 2:22 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Francene,
    I think there is a little difference in white canes internationally. I will ask about the white canes in the UK in my sight support group. Thank you for sharing your experience and I hope you found it interesting. 🙂
    Thanks, as always, for your comment,
    Amy

  • October 19, 2015 at 6:12 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Amy!

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen a red or a white cane. Nor did I know there was a significant difference in the type of canes that are used by the blind. Heck, I just thought they all used the same “standard” kind.

    Goes to show you how much I know!

    – Bonnie
    Bonnie Gean recently posted…Are You a Juggler or an Entrepreneur?My Profile

  • October 19, 2015 at 6:25 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Bonnie,
    SO nice to hear from you!
    I didn’t know either. I found her article really interesting! Today I am posting information on the debate of various cane colors vs the standard white cane. I hope you’ll drop by and read more about it. Thanks, and lovely to hear from you again!
    Ant

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

CommentLuv badge

0 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 Pin It Share 0 LinkedIn 0 Buffer 0 Email -- 0 Flares ×